What outcome, or benefit might you expect from attending Pain Care Yoga classes?

don't lose hope picWell, much like anything, it depends. The answer is rarely straightforward and definitive.

As mentioned in the last post everyone comes in with their own experience of pain,  history,  individual, unique life circumstances. What might be helpful for one, will not likely be the same for another.

Below are a few comments made during a recent class, which illustrates this difference, for each person.

“I slept so much better all last week.”

“I’m not really using my cane anymore. My leg feels stronger, and I have no pain.”

“My back went out last week for a couple of days. I was flat on my back, so I used one of the (breath-awareness-distraction) practices and it really helped me get through it.”

And your back now? – Me

“It’s fine, now.”

“I’m so surprised. Normally I cannot walk around without my shoes on.”

Did you feel pain, while we were doing this (walking exploration, practice)? – Me

“No, I had no pain at all.”

I can’t say what will happen for you, or for another. Most often though, people will begin to experience feelings of calm, safety, less or no pain during class. And, some will begin to transition those responses and feelings into their daily lives.

Like most things in life, what we do, what we practice, we get better at. I would say the same, in this case. If you only practice during our class, for an hour a week, you may not see as much progress, notice as much difference. However, if you do a little, each day, I bet your experience will be similar to these others.

What I highlight to people, from both their comments and experiences is that something changed. To get curious about that, and realize they created the change.

It wasn’t something done to them.

From there, they begin to feel some hope. Perhaps a little empowered and more able to start exploring and learn to self-manage or resolve their persistent pain.

If you’re interested in how this might work for you, the next 6-week series of Pain Care Yoga classes begin at the end of February. I’m also available for one-to-one in-person or ‘zoom’ online sessions and would love to hear from you.

 

Who Attends Yoga Classes for Chronic Pain? All kinds.

hearts croppedMost people I talk to wonder how yoga might help with their long-term, persistent or chronic pain. So, I thought I might tell you this week a little about who comes to these classes, what we do and why, or the outcomes experienced.

Let’s begin with who attends.

Most people in these classes (or private 1-to-1 sessions) have never done yoga before.

Classes tend to consist of people who don’t turn up in yoga studios, who probably never thought of doing yoga to help with their pain. After all, most of the marketing and imaging around yoga is out of reach for many people, let alone people who have difficulty or experience pain when they move.

Most, are around mid-life; perhaps 45 or older.

The oldest student who’s attended is 78. Most are about 50 – 65 years old. Once in a while someone younger will attend, perhaps in their 30’s. Currently, my youngest client is 13.

What are some of the conditions, or diagnoses they have?

The most common condition is people with persistent back pain and/or those with fibromyalgia. Most often, those with fibromyalgia have had it 20 to 30 years or more. Others have osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sciatica, other musculoskeletal pain (hips, shoulders, feet, and neck seem to be the most common). Chronic pelvic pain, is another. Or those who are currently going through cancer treatment, or recovering from it.

What are some of the conditions or diagnoses that often accompany persistent pain?

Most often it’s either (or both) anxiety and depression.  Many suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic fatigue, sleep issues (insomnia, sleep apnea, etc.), incontinence.

You can see there is such a wide variety and it’s not really ‘yoga’ people coming to these particular classes. Again, from what I know about most, they are people who have tried many other things that haven’t worked for them over the long term or are using yoga as complementary to or integrated with other aspects of their personal comprehensive pain management or treatment plan.

Up next on the blog, we’ll dig into what we do in these classes. I hope you’ll join me.

 

 

Let’s Get You Moving Again

Back facts

The Editorial in the British Journal of Medicine (BJM), begins

“Low back pain (LBP) is the leading cause of disability worldwide, and is often associated with costly, ineffective and sometimes harmful care.[1]

I’ve written about this before, here.

What drives disability and poor care?[2]

Unhelpful beliefs about LBP are associated with greater levels of pain, disability, work absenteeism, medication use and healthcare seeking. Unhelpful beliefs are common in people with and without LBP, and can be reinforced by the media, industry groups and well-meaning clinicians.”

The purpose of the editorial (made free due to popular demand, read it here) and the infographic is to “identify 10 common unhelpful beliefs about LBP and outline how they may influence behavioral and psychological responses with pain”.

The authors are also “calling on clinicians to incorporate these into their interactions with patients.”

This is so important. It’s why I always include a touch of education and information as part of my Pain Care Yoga classes. When people are in pain, it’s difficult to understand why it might be safe to move, how important it is to move and how movement “doesn’t mean you are doing harm – FACT #5”.

I hope these FACTS will bring some curiosity to your beliefs. I hope you might consider what you believe and how they might influence your experience of pain, either positively or negatively.

Sometimes, however, information is not enough. I, we, can give you all the ‘FACTS’ but often until you experience that you CAN move without pain it’s difficult to change beliefs.

As called for in the editorial, I am personally committed to bringing evidence-informed information and education to the people I work with and hope to provide a new experience to get you moving again, with confidence.

  1. Foster NE, Anema JR, Cherkin D, et al. Prevention and treatment of low back pain: evidence, challenges, and promising directions. The Lancet 2018;391:2368-83.
  2. Buchbinder R, van Tulder M, Oberg B, et al. Low back pain: a call for action. The Lancet 2018;391:2384-8.

 

Taming the Beast, that is pain

Professor Lorimer Moseley explains how pain scientists are making amazing discoveries that can help you understand your pain, the first step in taming the beast.

As you’ll see, pain always involves the nervous system and how your nervous system can be retrained.

  • “How do you know if your pain system is being overprotective?”
  • “How do you retrain your pain system to be less protective?”
  • “How do you know if you’re safe to move?”

Learning a little about pain neuroscience education can be helpful. [1]

What complements this is not only learning but experiencing how YOU can change or modulate your nervous system.

Use the tools yoga has to offer; gentle movement, breath and awareness practices… to soothe and calm the system. To ‘Tame the Beast’.

You can find more information and resources at TameTheBeast.org.

[1] Louw, Adriaan & Zimney, Kory & Puentedura, Emilio & Diener, Ina. (2016). The efficacy of pain neuroscience education on musculoskeletal pain: A systematic review of the literature. Physiotherapy Theory and Practice. 32. 1-24. 10.1080/09593985.2016.1194646.